Recruiting Intelligence

New Research: U.S. Global Alumni Management

U.S. Global Alumni Management

Read all about it!

Hot off the electronic presses: our newest research on global alumni from Intead and Academic Assembly, Inc. Together we analyzed responses from more than 100 U.S. academic professionals about how their institutions manage global alumni.

Ready to up your alumni game, and strengthen your recruitment, fundraising, and more? Read on and dive into out free white paper!

In the meantime, we hope that we will see you at any one of our many presentations during the AIRC and ICEF conferences over the next 7 days. The Intead team will be sharing lecturns with Monmouth University, UCLA Extension, Temple University, Sandy Spring Friends School, Academic Assembly, Sunrise Education and WholeRen.

The Intead team will be offering up fresh data and ideas to help you recruit international students from community colleges (Ben) and private boarding schools (Kellie). We'll be diving deep into Chinese student personas (Patricia). We'll be looking at the importance of internal alignment (Ben) as it relates to the international student experience on your campus. And we'll be presenting for the first time ever: our inaugural research on global alumni (Kate). Spoiler alert: they aren't being used effectively...but you already knew that, right?

We think we'll raise a few eyebrows (that's our version of having a wild time in Florida ;-)

Read on to get the real download on this great new global alumni analysis...

Where in the world are your alumni?

Alumni are one of the most valuable assets in an academic institution’s portfolio. They’re vital for recruitment: who better to sing your praises than a satisfied former student? They’re faithful donors, motivated by a personal connection to the university. They’re powerful brand ambassadors: each sweatshirt sold is a walking billboard.

Most universities acknowledge the importance of alumni, hosting homecoming reunions and maintaining steady communication. And yet, one segment of former students is too often overlooked: global alumni.

Who exactly are your global alumni?

When we talk about global alumni, we don’t just mean students who came to your institution from abroad. We mean any former student who is now living outside of the U.S., including one-time domestic students who have relocated. We also mean students who are living and working in more than one country: a particularly hard-to-manage group referred to as “transnational alumni.”

All of these global alumni represent huge value to institutions. And yet, most U.S. institutions aren’t feeling very confident in their global alumni management.

How do we know?

In July 2017, Academic Assembly and Intead co-sponsored the first national benchmark survey of best practices in international alumni relations management. This study was open to administrators of U.S. colleges, universities, and other post-secondary institutions working in development, admissions, international affairs, or alumni engagement roles. 

We asked respondents about their institutions’ current international alumni management practices, their rating of their programs’ consistency and effectiveness, their areas of frustration, and how much value their institution ascribes to this work.

We heard from over 100 academic professionals. Curious what they had to say? Lucky you! Our white paper is available for free [click the download button below].

What will you learn? Here’s a sneak peek.

  1. Are global alumni programs getting the staff support they deserve?
  1. Just how crazy is data management driving your colleagues? 
  1. Are senior managers making this work a priority?

We think you will find a wealth of information in this new whitepaper to share with your colleagues. And maybe you won't feel quite so alone in your efforts to address some important issues on your campus.

If you are feeling adrift in your own global alumni management, we just might know some folks who can help. 

Download

 

Know Your Neighborhood - Fall 2017
Global Alumni Management for U.S. Institutions